Categories 21st Century Media Practice, Final Project : Immersive Telepresence in Theatre

Cirkus School & Singing


During the telepresence week, we would spend each morning doing a warm up session, focusing on mind body and voice. When we got to Tampere, the tempo change, what had been limited to some extent was togetherness in a tangible form. They had shared a digital immersive space, with a window into each other worlds. however a tangible, connectedness and physical space had not been shared. And Cirkus school is where the process was going to begin.

Ive realised on this whole experience that actors like to get up close and personal. This is something that I have always struggled with, I like my own space and too me if was something that I hadn’t part in. I had always been on the periphery, and circus school was the same. It would take till the end of the week in a body movement class for that to be broken.

The method I approached was more ethnographic. Firstly because I am in no way in any physical form to be carrying a student on my back, secondly I wanted to observe how both sets of students formed their : ‘tribe’ for want of better word.

Through the use of the acrobatic classes, taught by Yolie the circus performer, the students began to develop this trust. And secondly through the use of voice in Soilas’ session.

Relating this to the research in the  Sisters of Sound Part 1 & Sisters of sound Part 2 , specifically the neuroscience and what happens to the brain. Humans within their communities would often come together to sing. It was a form of identity and Soila brought this out in them, by instructing them to find there inner vikings.

The Finnish students and Coventry students where now forming their community in a different set, they were syncing up creatively and collaborating in a way that was so human, the energy in the room was overwhelming and powerful.

The neuroscience of singing shows that when we sing our neurotransmitters connect in new and different ways. It fires up the right temporal lobe of our brain, releasing endorphins that make us smarter, healthier, happier and more creative. When we sing with other people this effect is amplified- Prof. S Wilson


Even they way in which I have filmed it, has been a challenge. I can at the time, that I was fairly blown away with what I was experiencing. I wanted to capture everything and I didn’t know what to focus on. Jon my colleague who you can see recording the sound in the background, is grinning and smiling the whole way through. He was also experiencing the same energy and it did just want to make you smile. As it really was a coming together moment, that was so pure and human in its energy no one would have helped but smiled and laughed…. even if they felt uncomfortable by what they were experiencing.






Categories Final Project : Immersive Telepresence in Theatre

The Sisters of Sound- Soila Sariola Part 1

…”People speak many different languages from all over the world, but music is their common ground. “… Charles Hazel-Wood ( Conductor- BBC Proms- Human Planet)

Actors when in training have to be centred both in the mind, body and voice. It is an understanding of the human psyche, the concept within the role which is ultimately built upon the range of human experiences through body, sensorium, mind, emotion intuition & spirit (M. Fortier, Theory/Theatre an introduction 2016)

Throughout the week of rehearsals, each morning would consist of a type of body movement or vocal class. It would centre around the use of the body being used as an instrument. When we think of the body, we think of the physical form, but what about the voice, and the existential projection that most humans possess. Language is one form of communication, but we cannot always connect in this way, yet Charles Hazel-Wood states, it is music that is our common ground.

Yet to understand Music, we really have to understand sound… And this first place is within ourselves and the vocal range that  the human can possess, if he channels it beyond the vocal chords.

These experimentations of creating sounds with the body began with the first session with Soila Sarola. A professional Alto singer and is a graduate specialising in Finnish folk music, where the voice is the main instrument. She is one of the members of the Finnish six-voice a cappella ensemble Rajaton, a Finnish word for ‘boundless’ and has released over 16 albums with the group. Soila also composes music scores for choirs and is a graduate of Finnish Folk Music.




Categories Communication, Final Project : Immersive Telepresence in Theatre

Adobe Connect & King Lear:Online.


“Anyone can lecture from the butt, only very few can act.”
― Pawan Mishra, Coinman: An Untold Conspiracy

So Monday came and the drum roll began. The whole week of a technical set-up was the walk up the aisle to finally beginning this process of using telepresence as a technical form, to rehearse William Shakespeare’- King Lear (1604-1606). The students had been given their roles, scenes and acts. They had informally met through Facebook, however they were about to check into ‘Adobe Connect’. Whereby they would be given the bedrock knowledge and history of Shakespeare.


This was the Kickstart lecture, the day that the students would participate in an ‘Adobe Connect’ room. Whereby Tom could deliver his 2 hour lecture on the subject of Shakespearean theatre. In a normal situation a lecture would be in a classroom, directing this information outwardly.

‘Adobe connect’ is a conferencing software, that enables a multiple layered method to teach within a virtual space. This virtual space is essentially your classroom, whereby you can discuss and share content, videos and ask questions.

It gives another form of communication that is not normally seen within a lecture room or a classroom.  Whereby information is given, but the investment sometimes will not be received back. There is participatory culture, respect and less of ‘lecture’ form, whereby the investment of knowledge can be measured back, through the engagement and participation, that is visual and more intimate.

Participatory culture shifts the focus of literacy from one of individual expression to community involvement.

Henry Jenkins
Categories 21st Century Media Practice, PGCE, Techology & people

MySpace – MySocial experience.

2004 Myspace started,

And I had started University in the September of 2003, my friends and I all followed and chatted to each other on MSN messenger & organised our students nights by communicating through text message and calls. Then someone said ” Hey check out this site, sign up and add me” 

I log on, typed in, signed up and was greeted by this guy.. Tom

Categories 21st Century Media Practice, Art

Bill Viola, Yorkshire Sculpture Park & Giant Bunnies

Bill Viola is one of worlds modern, visual artists, who uses video and sensory artistry. He has for over 40 years created art in various forms, such as installations, architectural video installations, warped sound environments, while also commercial work for television. The environmental impact of the senses through perception is a way for humanity to explore self-knowledge. What is it to be human is the main question. He uses experiences such as birth, death and human consciousness. The work is spiritual both in methods and traditions.

The whole experience of going to see the exhibition at Yorkshire Sculpture park was one of a small self- exploration against the elements. We were warned that it was muddy, and yes it was. We were warned that it would be cold and yes it was. And finally we were told to wear sensible clothing…. we were a bunch of under-prepared misfits. But this was this first lesson.

Categories 21st Century Media Practice, Art

Art & the electronic Superhighway 2016-1966




The Electronic Superhighway is a back to the future, historical exhibition, displaying over 100 artworks and the impact of computer technologies and the Internet. South Korean Artist Nam June Paik originally coined the term Electronic Superhighway. He forecasted the idea of a global connection through the use of technologies back in 1974. The Exhibition starts with the technologies that we are familiar with in 2016 and takes this technical dreamscape back all the way to 1966 and finishes with “Experiments in Art & Technology” (E.A.T). EAT was an iconic art movement that took place in 1966.